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Bucket List Unlocked: New York Yankees Stadium


Yankee Stadium stadium is located in the Bronx, a borough of New York City. It is the home ballpark of the New York Yankees, one of the city’s Major League Baseball (MLB) franchises, from 1923 to 1973 and then from 1976 to 2008. The stadium hosted 6,581 Yankees regular season home games during its 85-year history. The stadium was built from 1922 to 1923 for $2.4 million ($33.9 million in 2016 dollars). The stadium’s construction was paid for entirely by Yankees owner Jacob Ruppert, who was eager to have his own stadium after sharing the Polo Grounds with the New York Giants baseball team the previous 10 years.

Yankee Stadium opened for the 1923 MLB season   and at the time, it was hailed as a one-of-a-kind facility in the country for its size. Over the course of its history, it became one of the most famous venues in the United States, having hosted a variety of events and historic moments during its existence. While many of these moments were baseball-related—including World Series  games, no-hitters, perfect games  and historic home runs the stadium also hosted boxing matches, the 1958 NFL Championship Game concerts. The stadium went through many alterations and playing surface configurations over the years. The condition of the facility worsened in the 1960s and 1970s, prompting its closing for renovation from 1974 to 1975. The renovation significantly altered the appearance of the venue and reduced the distance of the outfield fences. (source: Wikipedia)

I am a fan of New York Yankees it’s started when I was in Taiwan and I used to watched live games of Major League Baseball. I was into a different adrenaline rush when Yankees and Red Sox was playing. Derek Jeter, Mariano Riviera, Andy Pettitte, Bernie Williams, and Alex Rodriquez were my favorite players.

The rivalry between the two teams added to my curiosity and why I was hooked to the NY Yankees. In 1919, Red Sox owner Harry Frazer sold star player Babe Ruth to the Yankees , which was followed by an 86-year period in which the Red Sox  did not win a World Series. This led to the popularization of a superstition known as the “Curse of the Bambino”, which was one of the most well-known aspects of the rivalry.

Standing in front of the stadium is another bucket list unlocked in my journey. I hope someday I would be able to watch the live game and experience the real thrill cheering on the team.


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